Architecture

Midcentury Modern architecture

Midcentury Modern architecture

The Midcentury Modern movement in America was an adaptation of two austere, straight-lined architectural movements in Europe: the International and Bauhaus styles. American mid-century architecture, which spanned roughly from the late 1930s to the ’70s, is warmer and more organic, often with wood elements — beams, columns, walls — where the Europeans employed concrete and steel.

WHAT MAKES IT MIDCENTURY

Flat or vaulted roofs, large plate-glass windows, open floor plans and a feeling of the inside and outside blurred into one — thanks not only to walls of glass and large glazed doors that slide away but also to the continuation of the same materials outside as inside, especially flooring. (Think slate, terrazzo or travertine.) Other cues are carports, clerestory windows, atriums and large stone or brick fireplaces which anchor the whole house.

WHY IT WORKS

Midcentury Modern brings nature in via its walls of windows. It’s a refreshing way to live, harmoniously with the outdoors. The clean lines of Midcentury Modern architecture also allow the eye and mind to relax — leading to expansive thoughts.

FAMOUS EXAMPLES

The dramatically cantilevered Fallingwater in the Pennsylvania woods by Frank Lloyd Wright; the glass-walled house in rural Connecticut for himself by Philip Johnson; the long, low, see-through Stahl House by Pierre Koenig, which hangs over Los Angeles.

Midcentury Modern homes for sale

$23,000,00010210 Strait6 Beds, 7.4 Baths11,387 sq. ft.
$3,900,0005315 Rock Cliff4 Beds, 3.2 Baths6,147 sq. ft.
$3,200,0004808 Bill Simmons4 Beds, 4.1 Baths5,277 sq. ft.
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